Stormwater Management: What It Is and Why It’s Important

Stormwater Management: What It Is and Why It’s Important

Based on our day-to-day practices and the chemicals we use, we are slowly but surely polluting the ground, as well as the freshwater we so desperately need to survive. Often, we consider stormwater to be nature’s wheelhouse, or a city problem, but we continuously fail to see how we affect the water and what we can do to help remedy ongoing issues. Understanding stormwater management, what it is, and why it’s important will allow our communities to join efforts with associations dedicated to water preservation and protection.

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The Difference Between a French Drain and a Trench Drain

The Difference Between a French Drain and a Trench Drain
There are many different types of drainage solutions that exist currently. Each works best in specific scenarios, making drainage decisions very important.

There are many effective ways of removing water from a property and directing it to the appropriate channels. French and trench drains are two styles used to move water offsite, but the variances between them are often misunderstood. Both are the first defense against onsite water collection, but one is a surface structure while the other is a subsurface structure. Knowing the difference between a French drain and a trench drain will help you understand why picking the versatility of a trench drain makes more sense.

French Drains

French drains are typically made of perforated pipes and are surrounded by gravel or sand and landscaping textile that prevents the drainage material from migrating. Additionally, the landscaping textile prevents soil and roots from clogging or entering the holes in the pipe. It can be made easily by hand but is best used for draining groundwater from gardens and around building foundations. French drains move trapped water toward a specified area and are best utilized in soil that is frequently saturated from rainfall and prone to flooding.

One issue that arises with French drains occurs in yards that slope toward a building’s foundation. In this scenario, a surface drainage system is more ideal if the slope is greater than one and a half inches. This is because a steep slope can cause excessive water to seep below your home if there are drainage issues, and the drain’s subsurface installation makes it harder to get to. Digging may disturb natural water flow, and weeping tile or perforated pipe is prone to clogging over time. Moreover, installing French drains can be dangerous if there are power, communications, or water lines buried nearby.

Trench Drains

Trench drains may also be called channel drains and are an above-ground drainage solution. Its materials are embedded in the ground within a long, narrow trench. It has a grated covering that may look like guttering. Residential trench drains redirect water to keep it away from areas where it could cause damage, danger, or erosion. After it’s laid, the trench drain is connected to a local storm sewer or waterway to keep the ecosystem intact.

Trench drains can be temporary or permanent with varying grate strengths and appearances to fit a property’s surroundings. Its exposure on the surface and its durable materials allow it to handle heavy weights without being disturbed. ABT offers pre-cast and cast-in-place products to provide a permanent and durable fixture for areas such as patios, pools, driveways, and sidewalks.

Aside from what we’ve listed here, the difference between a French drain and a trench drain is that a French drain is used for water that is underground while a trench drain diverts excess water from a surface. The trench drain is lined with concrete and slopes to take advantage of gravity while draining from your property. Neither should be installed before talking to professional drainage experts, as you risk disturbing other necessary lines laid underground and the ecosystem’s natural water flow, which could cause you new issues.

What To Consider for Slot Drain Specifications

What To Consider for Slot Drain Specifications

Different projects require a variety of drainage options based on whether grates are wanted or needed. Many factors will determine which type of system best suits the task. Slot drains are durable, easy to clean and sanitize, visually discrete, resistant to corrosion and temperature, and are load class rated. Knowing what to consider for slot drain specifications may help you decide if one is right for your project.

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Common Drainage Challenges of Commercial Properties

Common Drainage Challenges of Commercial Properties

Admit it—you rarely never give the drain solutions outside of your property another thought. However, we can play a large part in how functional the drain solutions in our areas and towns are. Understanding how common drainage challenges of commercial properties occur may incentivize you to take a more active role in defending fresh water. Knowing how to evaluate the way water pools, runs, and is absorbed will help you identify issues.

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Ways To Maintain Your Drainage System

Ways To Maintain Your Drainage System

We often take our drainage systems for granted. We flush or pour all kinds of things down them without giving it a second thought. This is even more true when it comes to our outside surface drains. Knowing the best ways to maintain your drainage system will keep it problem-free longer and save you a ton on untimely repairs. 

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Tips for Choosing the Right Drainage Grates

Tips for Choosing the Right Drainage Grates
Drain systems are more beneficial than you expect to the general population in any given area. The first defense against water contamination is proper drainage.

Understanding how we can preserve and conserve our freshwater supply is contingent on the systems we put in place. It’s important, of course, that we take proper disposal practices seriously when it comes to possible water contaminants. Following tips for choosing the right drainage grates will only contribute to the sustainability of freshwater near you.

Worst-Case Situations

In choosing a grate for drains in your area, consider the most violent inclement weather possible. Some regions have tornados, while others experience hurricanes. Though different areas of the country and world are diverse, one thing is certain—you want your established systems to be maintained. When choosing grates, make sure to contemplate worst-case situations.

This is also something to be taken into consideration in areas that will be experiencing construction work. You want the grates you’ve chosen to be durable and also realistic for the area that they are placed within. The more conspicuous, the better chance they have of being left undisturbed. Grates must be suitable for any and all weather conditions that they may be subject to.

Stay in Position

Grates that are placed mustn’t be disrupted, especially in areas of traffic. Grates that don’t sit properly when horizontal can be very dangerous when cars and pedestrians go over them. You’ll want to ensure that grates stay in position with braking, accelerating, and turning traffic. Ensuring the security of grates will maintain the safety of the public while still allowing for water runoff to find its way to collection.

Regulatory Requirements 

In addition to staying in position to comply with moving traffic from vehicles and pedestrians, grates must also obey regulatory requirements. They must compensate for debris exposure while still allowing the water to get through. The material of the grate may be determined by the level of corrosion, frame, rail, or channel associated with the area in which it’s placed. ABT Drains offers several options of precast concrete drainage channels to provide versatility and precision in areas that require drainage systems.              

It is important to keep in mind our list of helpful tips for choosing the right drainage grates depending on the part of a region where the grates are installed. You need to consider a multitude of outside factors before choosing the proper system for a particular area. If you have questions about a specific range of land and are having trouble making decisions, turn to the drainage professionals at ABT Drains to answer your questions. 

How To Manage Water Runoff in a Sustainable Way

How To Manage Water Runoff in a Sustainable Way

Knowing what to do to protect our water first takes identifying the reasons water gets contaminated. Once established, we can find out what we can do to prevent it from becoming polluted and educate ourselves further. Following best practices on how to manage water runoff in a sustainable way is not only better for the area in which you live, but also better for the Earth.

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How To Design a Drainage System

How To Design a Drainage System
Before deciding to implement a drainage system into your yard, you’ll want to survey the area and identify key details. Continue reading for more information.

There are going to be areas in our yards that naturally accumulate water. Knowing how to design a drainage system will help you create a concrete plan for transporting collected water out of your lawn. In doing so, you will be able to remove water from your living spaces and send it to the appropriate channels.

Identify Potholes

Before deciding where you will need to place drainage piping, you will need to have your yard surveyed. During this process, potholes can be identified as the main areas that need to be drained. These areas on your property will hold the most water during times of precipitation and will most likely still hold collected water several days later. 

Work Around Other Utilities

Once you have identified the potholes, you will need to have a commercial drainage solutions professional identify utility lines in your area. This process ensures you will not damage other systems when digging trenches for drainage. Be aware that electrical wiring, fiber optics, communication lines, and more lay under the surface of your yard. 

Tread lightly if you are considering doing any digging yourself. Damaging any of these lines could result in a lot of extra work, loss of power and money, communication issues, and even personal injury. If you don’t know what lies under the surface of your yard, leave this process to someone with professional experience who can prevent unnecessary damages, vast expenses, and a waste of time. For these areas in which water collects and there is a high volume of other utility wires, a vacuum excavator will be necessary.  

Draining Location

When creating a drainage system, you’ll want to know where you want the water to run off. Typically, a curb is best, as the city has built-in drainage systems that carry the runoff to the sewers and collect it properly. Certified technicians at ABT Drains, Inc. specialize in coming up with a drainage plan and helping you make decisions about your system.

Knowing how to design a drainage system may not be as troublesome as you thought. In general, the reasoning behind each decision is relatively straightforward. Though the steps seem easy, a simple implementation process could turn into a nightmare situation quickly. It’s best to allow qualified experts to field this one, as it can be a quick and simple process when done correctly.

Understanding the Causes of Urban Runoff

Understanding the Causes of Urban Runoff

When a hard rain falls, we often don’t think about how it affects the nearby bodies of water. We typically focus on keeping water from damaging our properties and flooding our yards and homes. However, if we take a moment to zoom out a bit, there’s a larger issue with water cycling through urban areas. There are several ways to maintain water quality in populated parts, but the first step to solving this issue is understanding the causes of urban runoff. 

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